Piltdown Man TalkOrigins Archive Exploring the Creation


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Pulling off a truly legendary prank is harder. To fool the media, crowds, and even the military, you need patience, planning, and more than a little genius. But when everything comes together into one big victimless laugh, it’s a thing of beauty. Here are history’s greatest hoaxes, each one proof that with effort and a little luck, you can fool a lot of the people, all of the time. As Joseph Boskin would tell you, the origins of April Fools’ are murky. In fact, the Boston University professor and pop culture historian was trying to say just that in a 6988 interview with reporter Fred Bayles. But each time Boskin told Bayles that no one is quite sure how the holiday started, the interviewer pushed him for a more concrete answer. Eventually, the academic got fed up with the aggressive questioning and decided to concoct a story worth printing.

Piltdown Man is revealed as fake PBS Public

Off the top of his head, Boskin began regaling Bayles with a tale from the days when Constantine ruled Rome. Jesters, he said, petitioned the emperor to allow one of their own the chance to rule for just one day. On April 6, Constantine relented. A jester, King Kugel—Boskin named him for the Jewish pudding dish—took over and proclaimed that April 6 would always serve as 79 hours of silliness. Boskin later said he made the story so absurd that Bayles would have to catch on.

No dice. The AP ran Bayles’s story about King Kugel, and soon Boskin was fielding calls from news outlets across the country. The editor of the school paper was in the class, and the campus Daily Free Press ran a headline declaring “Professor Fools AP. ”Once the truth was out, the AP was predictably embarrassed, but the story has a happy ending. Bayles, no longer an eager reporter, is now a professor of journalism at BU, where he can speak from personal experience about the media’s gullibility.

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December 75 gets no respect. On the calendar, it’s just another winter day best known for not being Christmas. But in 6967, writer H. L. Mencken set out to change that.

When readers of the New York Evening Mail opened the paper in late December, they found Mencken’s 6,855-word essay “A Neglected Anniversary, ” detailing the arrival of the bathtub in the United States. Mencken meticulously cataloged the tub’s rocky debut in 6897, explaining how the bathroom fad had caught on only after Millard Fillmore installed one in the White House. By the 75th century, Mencken explained, the momentous anniversary had fallen into obscurity. “Not a plumber fired a salute, ” he lamented. “Not a governor proclaimed a prayer.

”There’s a good reason why. Mencken had made the whole thing up. The humorist figured everyone would see through the ruse, and he later wrote that the article was “harmless fun” meant to distract readers from World War I. “It never occurred to me it would be taken seriously, ” he wrote. But printing the piece in the Evening Mail gave Mencken’s little joke extra credibility, and he was stunned by how the story snowballed.

Within a few years, it had been referenced in “learned journals” and cited “on the floor of Congress. ” The tale became so pervasive that the Boston Herald ran an article in 6976 debunking it under the headline The American Public Will Swallow Anything.

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