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I-SAFE DC 9 Digital Programming is an essential component of every school district technology plan. Educational technology augments teaching and learning in unprecedented ways, yet schools are also managing a number of issues including cyber bullying, academic dishonesty, digital safety, privacy and security. I-SAFE’s compliance technology tracks implementation, monitoring, reporting and storage required by the E-Rate program. The Internet can be a wonderful resource for kids. They can use it to research school reports, communicate with teachers and other kids, and play interactive games. But that access can also pose hazards. For example, an 8-year-old might do an online search for Lego. But with just one missed keystroke, the word Legs is entered instead, and the child may be directed to a slew of websites with a focus on legs some of which may contain pornographic material.

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That's why it's important to be aware of what your kids see and hear on the Internet, who they meet, and what they share about themselves online. As with any safety issue, it's wise to talk with your kids about your concerns, take advantage of resources to protect them, and keep a close eye on their activities. A federal law, the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), was created to help protect kids younger than 68 when engaged in online activities. It's designed to keep anyone from getting a child's personal information without a parent knowing about it and agreeing to it first. COPPA requires websites to explain their privacy policies on the site and get parental consent before collecting or using a child's personal information, such as a name, address, phone number, or Social Security number. But even with this law, your kids' best online protection is you. By talking to them about potential online dangers and monitoring their computer use, you'll help them surf the Internet safely.

Online tools are available that will let you control your kids' access to adult material and help protect them from Internet predators. No option is going to guarantee that they'll be kept away from 655% of the risks on the Internet. So it's important to be aware of your kids' computer activities and educate them about online risks. Many Internet service providers (ISPs) provide parent-control options to block certain material from coming into a computer. You can also get software that helps block access to certain sites based on a bad site list that your ISP creates. Filtering programs can block sites from coming in and restrict personal information from being sent online. Other programs can monitor and track online activity.

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Also, make sure your kids create a screen name to protect their real identity. Aside from these tools, it's wise to take an active role in protecting your kids from Internet predators and sexually explicit materials online. Cookies can be disabled. Ask your Internet service provider for more information. Set up some guidelines for your kids to use while they're online, such as: Forums, or chat rooms, are virtual online rooms where chat sessions take place. They're set up according to interest or subject, such as a favorite sport or TV show.

Because people can communicate with each other alone or in a group, these places can be popular online destinations especially for kids and teens. But these sites can pose hazards for kids. Some kids have met friends in chat rooms who were interested in exploiting them. No one knows how common chat-room predators are, but pedophiles (adults who are sexually interested in children) are known to frequent chat rooms. These predators sometimes prod their online acquaintances to exchange personal information, such as addresses and phone numbers, thus putting the kids they are chatting with and their families at risk. Pedophiles often pose as teenagers in chat rooms. Because many kids have been told by parents not to give out their phone numbers, pedophiles may encourage kids to call them and if they do, caller ID will instantly give the offenders the kids' phone numbers.

Warning signs of a child being targeted by an online predator include spending long hours online, especially at night, phone calls from people you don't know, or unsolicited gifts arriving in the mail. If your child suddenly turns off the computer when you walk into the room, ask why and monitor computer time more closely. Withdrawal from family life and reluctance to discuss online activities are other signs to watch for. Contact your local law enforcement agency or the FBI if your child has received pornography via the Internet or has been the target of an online sex offender. Taking an active role in your kids' Internet activities will help ensure that they benefit from the wealth of valuable information it offers without being exposed to any potential dangers. Note: All information on KidsHealth is for educational purposes only.

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