Glossary Asexuality Archive


A listing of asexuality-related words. If you have any objections, clarifications, or words you d like to see added, please let me know. Ace: Colloquial abbreviation of asexual. Often used to refer to asexual people in a similar manner as gay or straight are used to refer to homosexual or heterosexual people. Ace also includes gray-asexual and demisexual people. Ace Spectrum: The grouping of asexual, demisexual, and gray-asexual under a single umbrella of related sexual orientation.

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Aesthetic Attraction: Non-sexual/non-romantic attraction to the way someone looks. Often described as the desire to admire someone like a painting, but not necessarily anything further. Allo: Usually short for Allosexual, but could also be short for Alloromantic, depending on context. Alloromantic: Someone who experiences romantic attraction not aromantic. Antisexual: General dislike of sexuality or sexual activity, including instances where other people are involved. Often accompanied by the belief that sex or sexuality in any form is bad or wrong. Antisexual views should not be confused with asexuality. Arc: Abbreviation for Averse, Replused, or Conflicted, which can describe someone s personal feelings about sex or romance. Aromantic: A romantic orientation characterized by a persistent lack of romantic attraction toward any gender. Arousal: Being turned on, generally accompanied by a physical genital response, such as erection and/or lubrication. Asexuality: A sexual orientation characterized by a persistent lack of sexual attraction to any gender. Autochorissexualism: Coined by Dr. Anthony Bogaert to describe the scenario where some ace people can be aroused by or masturbate to sexual situations or material, without experiencing attraction to those involved in the situation and without a desire to be personally involved in the situation. Averse: Feeling disgusted or put off by the thought of sex. It s not necessarily the thought that sex is wrong, more that there s a personal dislike. Biromantic: A romantic orientation characterized by romantic attraction regardless of gender.

Bisexual: A sexual orientation characterized by sexual attraction regardless of gender. Black Ring: When worn on the middle finger of the right hand, a black ring is an indicator that a person is asexual. Coming Out: The act of revealing one s sexual orientation to others. Demiromantic: A demiromantic does not experience romantic attraction unless they have already formed a strong emotional bond with the person. Demisexual: A demisexual does not experience sexual attraction unless they have already formed a strong emotional bond with the person. The bond may or may not be romantic in nature. Please note that there is a difference between demisexuality, which involves attraction, and I don t have sex unless I love someone, which has to do with behavior. Erasure: How can I explain when there are few words I can choose? Sometimes, when people talk, they ll hideaway other people s sexuality. I don t know why. When this happens, it tends to turn the love to anger. Stop! It doesn t have to be like that. I say, I say, I say: I know it ain t easy to see the truth, but reach out and gimme gimme gimme a little respect, and live in harmony, harmony. Gray-Asexual: A gray-asexual may infrequently experience sexual attraction, may be unsure if they have,  or may experience low sexual desire, yet will generally identify as being close to asexual. Gray-asexuals differ from demisexuals in that demisexuals will require an emotional bond before experiencing attraction, yet graces do not necessarily require a bond. The word gray comes from the gray area between asexuality and non-asexuality. GSRM: Gender, Sexuality, and Romantic Minorities.

A deliberately inclusive replacement for the limited LGBT initialism. Heteroromantic: A romantic orientation characterized by romantic attraction to a different gender. Heterosexual: A sexual orientation characterized by sexual attraction to a different gender. Homoromantic: A romantic orientation characterized by romantic attraction to the same gender. Homosexual: A sexual orientation characterized by sexual attraction to the same gender. LGBTQIA: A common extension of the well-known LGBT acronym: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer/Questioning, Intersex, Asexual/Aromantic/Agender. Libido: Also called sex drive, a libido may cause arousal and/or strong desires or urges to engage in sexual activity (although not necessarily with a partner). MOGAI: Marginalized Orientations, Gender Identities, and Intersex. Panromantic: A romantic orientation characterized by romantic attraction regardless of gender. Pansexual: A sexual orientation characterized by sexual attraction regardless of gender. Repulsed: Feeling disgusted or put off by the thought of sex. It s not necessarily the thought that sex is wrong, more that it s icky. (Please note that romantic in this context does not necessarily mean flowers and sunsets on the beach and candlelit dinners. Sensual Attraction: A sense of I would like to engage in non-sexual physical activity with that person. Sexual Attraction:

A sense of I would like to engage in sexual activity with that person. I think demi should include demiromantic as well as demisexual. I also disagree with romantic attraction, but it is practically impossible to pin down since it s a very distinctive feeling that may or may not be connected to certain desires depending on the person. Hi, I m from brazilian community, and I d like to translate this glossary for our website. May I? Hello, did the word pie mean better than sex or are you talking about the food lol? I love your website! I m still trying to figure things out and your site is really helping me do so. I m still kind of confused, though, by what you mean by romance. How is a romantic attachment different from a strong emotional bond? It sounds like romance means a particularly strong affection, possibly even love (which may be entirely platonic). Is that about right? I have occasionally seen the term Ghost ace at various places on the web. If anyone knows what this means, I would love to get some insight. Yes. I ve fancied someone and not cared if they ve fancied me back never told them I liked them. MHello, I m not sure if that s what sexual attraction means. I identify as Ace, and sometimes I want to have sex with a person, not because they are sexually attractive, I believe it can be for other (consented, safe) reasons. Sexual attraction doesn t have to be the main, or even the part of the reason I want to have sex with someone. Such as because I felt like I love them, or I just want to do it for fun. I agree. I also strongly identify as ace, but I love making my partner feel good because the intimacy it has and it still feels good. I would argue that sexual attraction is more like feeling sexual arousal associated with a person. Asexuality doesn t mean no libido and there are other reasons to have sex besides attraction. Wow. I just thought I was a Hetrosexual Metrosexual, but I ve learnt I m a bit more than that now if I was to comment my entire sexuality identity. When we are young, most of us want to feel apart of something, I m 77 and I can say since possibly around the age of 76, I no longer need to define myself (or even justify myself) to anyone.

I am me, I like what I like and no one is going to tell me what I can and cannot like, or what I can and cannot do, or what I should or shouldn t believe in. I saw this website on BBC Three s Tiger Honey Drew s Season 7 Episode 6 Documentary. I am 55 and I don t feel a strong urge to come out except to GPs who ask concerned questions, nor do I like too many terms to define my sexuality. I studied Ma Psychology and sociology and feel that vocabulary links to culture and history. Interesting list. I kind of agree that definitions can be imposing on culture and history. However, I think that at this time in our current culture, these definitions are beneficial for those that can t find themselves in the generic definitions of heterosexual, homosexual, etc. These terms help us to quickly explain to others who we are in a nutshell. I find myself having to give a seminar on my sexuality just to get people to understand. But now with terms like these I can just say, I m a grace (I love that term! )I think that once we as a culture open our arms to this diversity of sexuality, the specific terms may not be necessary anymore. Btw, I disagree with the definition of a grace saying that we will generally identify as being close to asexual. I think that s making a major assumption about people that consider themselves graces. I really identify as being a grace, not an ace. I see the term grace as encompassing two terms: gray-asexual and gray-sexual. Even though I haven t had intercourse in 75+ years (more than most aces I d guess), I actually consider myself a gray-sexual since I like a lot of things that surround sex. I just don t care about it AS MUCH AS a normal sexual person so I don t seek out intercourse like normal sexuals do. Plus, to me, I m always afraid that if I have intercourse with a guy that he s going to feel a much stronger bond with me than I do with him. So in a way I m holding out for Mr. Right with whom I want that bond to be formed so it s not for religious reasons or anything like that )I m agnostic). I am said to have a very low sexual drive. By then I had been with my future husband quite a while, but how was I to know since we were not sexually attracted to each other! Yes I can see the point of labelling oneself, although for me the word asexual is satisfactory. My mother is a romantic you name it. Ps came her for the definition of DemiRomantic/Demisexual. Im not sure which I identify with more.

Thanks for the information!

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